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Do the rock groups worship and serve Satan? They surely do,—and this by their own admission.

Here are several examples of how these rockers openly declare their abject loyalty to the devil. The rock group, Black Sabbath, has been known to make altar calls to Lucifer in some of their concerts.

Stevie Nicks, of the Fleetwood Mac group, is known for openly dedicating their concerts to the witches of the world. At an Iron Maiden concert in Portland, Oregon, their first words were "Welcome to Satan's Sanctuary."

On the back of their album, Welcome to Hell, the rock group, Venom, has these words printed in bold print: "We are possessed by all that's evil. The death of your God we demand: We . . sit at the Lord Satan's right hand."

The rock group, called Satan, has weird album covers and horrible music. However, the album covers and music of the other rock groups are about as bad.

Savoy/Brown's album is named Hellbound Train. The album Healing, by Todd Rundren, includes a song, entitled "Tiny Demons."

In their Shout at the Devil album, Motley Crue has a song, entitled "God bless the Children of the Beast!"

One of the reasons that the various rock groups dare to so openly talk and sing about their love for sex, perversion, hard drugs, and Satan—is because they believe they have Satan's protection. This has made them all the more brazen in their conduct and music—with devastating effects on their adoring, screaming worshipers.

These demon-controlled men know that the more they flaunt their demonology, the more they will be empowered by the devil to continue doing so. Yet it is all a deception. Satan is not nice to anyone! He brings ongoing misery and final destruction even to his own.

A master satanist, Aleister Crowley, helped teach Anton LaVey, who started the Satanic Church of America, with headquarters in San Francisco. Before his death, Crowley made human sacrifices in his home. That house is now owned by Led Zepplin guitarist, Jimmy Page.

Here are several of the rock groups which have openly identified with Aleister Crowley and his satanic teachings: Iron Maiden, Hall and Oates, The Beatles, Led Zepplin, Ozzy Osbourne, Eagles, Rolling Stones.

The father of Terri Nunn, the female sex symbol and leader of the Berlin group, taught her Eastern religions and her mother taught her astrology. Terri, in turn, taught it to her fans at rock concerts.

Ronnie James Dio, formerly with the group, Black Sabbath, is known for using the patented satanic salute (extending the index finger and smallest finger, so they look like horns). This is supposed to ward off evil spirits and spells—but, of course, it only places the one doing it more in the power of the devil. Prior to his horrible death in the 1990s, Anton LaVey also used that sign on the back of his Satanic Bible.
On the cover of his rock album, Holy Diver, Dio shows a demonic creature with horns, with the satanic salute with one hand and the other with a chain around the neck of a Christian minister, drown­ing him in water!

Grim Reaper is satanic and occultic. Their two albums are titled See You in Hell and Fear No Evil. "Come with me to a place you know so well. I will take you to the very gates of hell."

The three men in Iron Maiden readily admit that they are into witchcraft and the occult. For their album, Powerslave, they present Egyptian cultic themes. "The idea of Powerslave," says Bruce Dickenson, the leader of Iron Maiden, "is to try and get enough magic on the album so that it'd maybe rub off on those who hear it."

The stage for their "World Slavery Tour," has an Egyptian motif, complete with a stone coffin, and replicas of Isis (the occultic Egyptian goddess of fertility) and her mate Osiris (occultic god of the dead). Dickenson adds, "In other songs, we refer to guidance through tarot cards (witchcraft cards) and the ideas of Aleister Crowley."

"To people of antiquity, as well as of the modern world, Egypt appeared as the very mother of magic."—Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology, p. 285.

Marc Storace of Krocus says he is convinced his throat is energized by a supernatural force as soon as the band starts playing. "You can't describe it," he says, "except to say it's like a mysterious energy that comes from the metaphysical plane and into my body. It's like being a [spiritist] medium, contributing to the energy and using bits of it" (Circus, January 31, 1984).

Like the other rock groups, Motley Crue's presentation consists of sex, drugs, and violence. The symbol they use for their group is a pentagram (upside-down star) which is a symbol of Satan. Speaking of their stage shows, Nikki Sixx says, "We have skulls, pentagrams, and all kinds of satanic symbols on stage . . I've always flirted with the devil" (Circus, January 31, 1984).

The original band of Rob Halfor, the leader of Judas Priest, was named Lord Lucifer. They advertise on an album that "Judas Priest has sin for sale."

Ozzy Osbourne is front man for the heavy metal group, Black Sabbath. Constantly delving into witchcraft, he has continued to emphasize it after leaving Black Sabbath. On his album, Blizzard of Oz, he sang a song about one of the leading satanists of the 20th century, Aleister Crowley. As part of his satanic ritual, he publicly bites the head off a live bat. People are known to have committed suicide after listening to his song, Suicide Solution.

Police was the name of another rock group. Its song, Wrapped Around Your Finger, tells about Mephistopheles who will teach us how to enter a new, better sphere of existence. The word, "Mephis­topheles," comes from an opera in which Faust signs a compact with a demon who gives him success for a time, but later causes him to suffer a horrible death.

Bruce Springsteen has been guided by the spirits to mockingly appear onstage, dressed as a minister who says he was dead until rock music "saved him." "Welcome to the first church of the rock," he announces. He then ridicules going to heaven and promises the audience something better when they die.

Van Halen is one of the heavy metal rock bands. David Roth, its singer, says the demons taught him to emphasize sex while onstage. "Rock and roll is more than music, it's a lifestyle," he says. "I abandon my spirit to them. You work yourself up into that state and you fall in supplication of the demon gods . . Rape and pillage play important parts in rock and roll . . and . . yeah I'm toastmaster for the immoral majority" (Rock, April 1984). Roth says he is involved in the cultic Zen, a sect of Buddhism (Hit Parader, July 1984). One of his songs is Running with the Devil.

After Chrissie Hynde started The Pretenders and released their first album, everything seemed to go well. They were able to get lots of money, sex, and drugs. But, within two years, they had to fire the bass player for becoming a total heroin addict. Two years later, in 1984, their guitarist died at the age of 25 from an excess of cocaine and alcohol. In order to find solutions to her problems, rock friends of Chrissie suggested that she read the Hindu books and Hare Krishna's books. In a Rolling Stone magazine interview, she said there were times when she was so heavy on drugs and alcohol, she could not speak. But, she added, "But for every act of [public or filmed] sodomy I perform, I'm getting 10,000 pounds [British money] for now" (Rolling Stone, April 26, 1984).

John Lennon, along with his group, the Beatles, helped shape the values of an entire generation of young people. In 1974, John Green, an occultist, was hired by Yoko Ono (Lennon's wife) to be her tarot card reader. For years, he worked closely with John and Yoko. They did everything according to "the cards."

In the 1980s, a man living in Hawaii, who was also deep into the occult, was impressed by Satan to kill John Lennon—so he shot Lennon as he entered his New York City hotel.

—More examples of open worship of Satan in rock concerts could be cited!

The concern of the devil is to ruin and then kill everyone, including those he directly controls. Here are a few of many examples of his regard for those who give him faithful service:

Larry Gatlin started out in Texas, with his two brothers (the Gatlin Brothers), singing gospel songs "to share the love of Jesus Christ." Later, Larry got into big-time rock—and his life changed. After drugging himself out, he turned himself in to a drug rehabilitation center.

Marvin Gaye is another story of someone who abandoned the church so he could sing rock. He became so vile that his angry father shot him dead. "He became beastlike while under the influence of cocaine," his father said.

The three members of the Gap Band were sons of a Pentecostal minister. Although raised in a Christian home, now, like other jazz and rock musicians and singers, they are battling drugs, alcohol, and sexual immorality.

Billy Idol pleaded guilty of assaulting a 20-year-old girl in a New York motel after a concert.

In a later chapter in this book ("How Rock Stars Die") you will learn how 280 of them died!